Why the world needs more Katy Barfields

Why the world needs more Katy Barfields

One of the joys of being a journalist is that I get to interview people that I would have little or no chance of talking to in my everyday life. And just about everyone has something interesting to say.

But the real joy is coming across someone like Katy Barfield.

As founding CEO of Second Bite, Katy takes food that would otherwise go to landfill to a  Sacred Heart Mission in Melbourne where it’s made into meals for those who need one. This year Second Bite will provide around 10 million meals.

In the course of this work she discovered that Australian farmers are throwing out as much as 40 percent of their crop that they simply can’t sell – not because the fruit and vegetables are unfit to eat but because they’re not aesthetically perfect – and that, as a result, they’re struggling to survive. So she started advocating for the purchase of Nature’s Grade produce, which doesn’t discriminate against any of the crop because of aesthetic imperfections. And they she set up Spade and Barrow, an organisation buys the whole crop – big, small, perfect or misshapen – for a fair and transparent price and sells it on to, so far, commercial kitchens.

Katy says her greatest achievement would be to close the doors on Spade and Barrow because it isn’t needed any more. Her goal is to see edible produce of all shapes and sizes on supermarket shelves as well as commercial enterprises.

I’m a big fan.