These desert boots were made for (bush) walking

These desert boots were made for (bush) walking

A minor injury drew my attention to my knees and the importance of taking care of them. It occurred to me that I should get some for proper walking shoes; I’m hardly a serious bush walker but I do walk my dog in the bush for half an hour every day wearing desert boots if it’s dry, wellies if it’s wet. More support might be a good thing.

Then, as I was searching for my closest retailer, I came across an article suggesting that specialist walking shoes are a waste of money. Digging deeper, I found more and more articles from people like podiatrists and physiotherapists supporting the view that, unless you have the kind of physical problem that requires professional or medical treatment, the most important qualities in a walking shoe are comfort and grip. Which is why, according to one serious bush walker, many experienced walkers choose the humble Dunlop Volley.

So, my current thinking is that pronation is just natural variation. Arch supports range from useless to dangerous because they can chafe and blister the skin. And the only footwear which could be described as providing ankle support is a ski or other boot that stops you from moving your ankles at all.

I’m very happy to go with these arguments because they saved me around $200. Today I felt a lot warmer towards my desert boots – and my knee seems to be fine.