Stay positive about exercise; it will help you to stay positive.

Stay positive about exercise; it will help you to stay positive.

I keep on finding more reasons to exercise – apparently, it can boost your belief that you’re going to succeed. ‘How Regular Exercise Helps You Balance Work and Family’ reports an increase what’s known as self-efficacy, People with a strong sense of self-efficacy: view challenging problems as tasks to be mastered; develop deeper interest in the activities in which they...

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Exercise in a pill – would you take it?

Exercise in a pill – would you take it?

An observational study involving more than 44,700 black women and lasting almost 20 years found that regular, vigorous exercise offers significant protection against development of an aggressive subtype of breast cancer. According to this report in Oncology Nurse Advisor, black women who engaged in brisk exercise for a lifetime average of three or more hours a week had a 47 per cent reduced risk...

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Could exercise really make us want healthier, low-calorie food?

Could exercise really make us want healthier, low-calorie food?

When scientists talk about diet and exercise they generally relate today’s problems to things that made sense in the past. For instance, we’re attracted to sugar because sweeter berries were less likely to give a hunter gatherer an upset stomach. And we’re getting fat because we drive everywhere rather than roaming the plains in search of bison. So how can this article make...

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Treatment for cancer – who decides when enough is enough?

Treatment for cancer – who decides when enough is enough?

Cutting, burning, administering toxic chemicals… not an excerpt from a torturer’s handbook but the standard triumvirate of treatment for cancer. Surgery. Radiation. Chemotherapy. Having experienced all three I’m all for the idea of skipping those that don’t make a difference to your prognosis, and I think this article makes interesting reading. Obviously, it’s in everyone’s interest...

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Exercise: good for the hips, bad for the ears

Exercise: good for the hips, bad for the ears

A new study has shown that an exercise program can help people with hip osteoarthritis to delay or even avoid total hip replacement surgery. But other studies suggest it might not be a good idea to do the exercise at a gym. With noise levels commonly reaching well over 90 dB (decibels) or more, it’s the equivalent of doing your workout next to someone using a jackhammer. So you could find it...

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If cancer survivors are heroes where does that leave the people who die?

If cancer survivors are heroes where does that leave the people who die?

In this blog, Andrew Graystone makes some interesting points about the way we talk about cancer. For instance, I had no idea that it was Richard Nixon who turned cancer from a shameful secret into a very public war. Like Andrew, I feel uncomfortable with the battle analogy but for slightly different reasons. While he doesn’t necessarily want to turn his body into a war zone, I hate the...

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Neuroscience catches up with yoga

Neuroscience catches up with yoga

When I discovered Kundalini yoga a couple of years ago I found a lot to love. It immediately felt like the right practice for me – the perfect combination of physical activity and meditation. There were also aspects that made me glad I was doing it in the privacy of my own home. I’m not naturally a chanting kind of person, for example, and some of the hand and arm movements that accompany the...

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It’s hot and dry again. How long till there’s another fire?

It’s hot and dry again. How long till there’s another fire?

Thursday 17th October started promisingly enough. I’d been invited to record a podcast at my local library before giving a lunchtime talk about Poor me!, the book I wrote with Piers. It was an unusually hot day for October with temperatures well into the 30s. It was also very windy. By the time I parked my car, the wind was strong enough to rip the door out of my hand. The podcast went well...

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Being active is like a medication. Who says? 102-year-old Fauja Singh

Being active is like a medication. Who says? 102-year-old Fauja Singh

Fauja Singh didn’t start running till he was 89 and, since then, he has run nine full marathons. Recently retired from competitive running, he still jogs every day. Obviously, few people of any age could, or would want to, run a full marathon. I can’t think of anything worse. But I do like his message about taking responsibility for your own health and well-being. In this Guardian article...

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Stress causes dementia. How relaxing.

Stress causes dementia. How relaxing.

Don’t you love headlines like this one from the Independent? Stress in middle-aged women could increase risk of dementia Women who experience stressful events such as divorce are at a higher risk of developing the condition The rest of the article goes on to tell us that ‘common stressful life events may have “severe and long standing physiological and psychological consequences”...

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